Safe sex means taking precautions to prevent the spread of any sexually transmitted infection from one body to another.

Most sexually transmitted diseases (HIV, gonorrhoeic, hepatitis) are spread by bodily fluids (semen, blood, vaginal secretions) entering another person’s bloodstream. It can enter through wounds and sores, or through fragile membranes inside the vagina, urethra and anus.

Other sexually transmitted diseases (such as herpes, thrush, warts, and chlamydia) are spread by actual physical contact with the affected area of the genitals or mouth. Syphilis, cancers, and scabies can be caught from any skin contact.

Sex toys that other people have used can spread the infection. They need to be cleaned with bleach before they can be passed on.

How to use condoms correctly Before you put a condom on:

  • Use only approved condoms bearing the CE mark.

  • Store condoms in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight.

  • Check the expiration date on the condom.

  • Carefully tear the condom package apart – without using your teeth – to open it.

  • 5. If the condom appears damaged, discolored, or brittle, do not use it.

  • 6. Add a drop of lube inside the condom for more pleasure.

To put a condom on:

  • With one hand, squeeze the tip of the condom to make room for ejaculation.

  • With the other hand, roll the condom to the base of the penis or body.

  • Continue to use this hand to direct any air bubbles out of the condom.

  • Add lubricant to the outside of the condom to avoid excessive friction that may cause breakage.

  • Did the wrong side of the condom touch the tip of the erect penis? Ignore it and get a new one. These few seconds can contaminate the end of the condom entering the other person and transmit a sexually transmitted infection or cause pregnancy. A little semen goes a long way.

After the procedure:

  • Hold the base of the condom while pulling it out to avoid slipping.

  • Remove the condom and throw it in the trash, not the toilet.

  • Did you just have sex 30 minutes ago and want to start the second round? Use fresh condoms. It doesn’t matter if you don’t ejaculate or if the condom still fits snugly around your penis. Every sexual act, use a new condom.

Sex workers are professionals and make it their job to ensure they do not contract or transmit diseases.

This includes all diseases – sexually transmitted diseases, skin diseases, colds, coughs, influenza and any other infections. This is why you should never visit a sex worker if you are sick at all.

Arrive in clean clothes, after showering and brushing your teeth.

Sex workers insist on cleanliness. Some will ask you to shower upon arrival, others will wash your body as part of the erotic service. Clients and potential clients must understand that this work provides sex workers with a livelihood, and that becoming ill and becoming ill will disrupt their income as well as their health.

It should be clear that you are more likely to catch an STI from someone you picked up at a bar or from an amateur than from a professional. The reason for this is that professional sex workers are more likely to engage in safer sex than others.

How to stay safe:

  • Use condoms for all types of oral, vaginal, or anal sex. Cover any wounds elsewhere on the body if you will be playing with the genitals, rubbing, kissing or licking a partner.

  • Keep in mind that various diseases can be transmitted to both partners through oral sex. These include gonorrhoeic, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes, genital warts, parasites, giardia and hepatitis.

  • Sex workers have their own supply of condoms.

  • If you have unprotected sex with anyone, visit a genitourinary clinic for tests immediately. In fact, every sexually active person should get regular checkups because many infections have no obvious symptoms.

  • Never try to convince sex workers (or anyone else) to have unprotected sex with you. This is humiliating and dangerous.

  • The penis secretes semen before ejaculation, so you need a condom throughout the period of penetration.

  • Extra strong condoms and sufficient lube are required for anal sex.
  • Use a dental dam for protection during oral sex. It can be used as a barrier between the mouth and the vagina during cunnilingus and also between the mouth and the anus during cunnilingus. Prevents the transmission of virus-sized particles.

  • You don’t need to have sex in order to enjoy sex. There are many other exciting things you can do, such as playing erotic games, stroking and massaging, masturbating and oral sex, watching each other and talking sexy. You may feel as though you’ve had a more exciting time with a sex worker if you take the time to explore some of these options.

  • If you have a herpes sore, do not make an appointment with a sex worker until you are sure it is gone. If a sore appears before the appointment, cancel it. Never allow a herpes sore to come into contact with another person’s skin.

  • If you have vaginal or penile discharge, blood spots, pain when urinating, or other symptoms, go to the clinic, refrain from sexual intercourse, and adhere to the clinic’s instructions.

  • Each condom should be used only once. If it falls, use another. If a condom falls or splits during intercourse you will need to use emergency techniques, seek advice from your clinic.

Warnings:

  • Condoms made of animal membranes do not protect you as well as others. Stick with latex or polyurethane, or talk to your doctor about your other options.

  • Don’t try to stay safe by using more than one condom. This causes extra friction, making the condom more likely to break.

  • Do not reuse condoms. If you take off the condom, do not put it back on, even if there is no liquid.

  • Never keep a condom in your purse “just in case.” Body heat and pressure accelerates the decomposition of the condom in the capsule.

  • Do not insert a condom if the package is cracked or torn before use.

  • Never flush a condom down the toilet, as this can cause it to flush. Flushing a used condom down the drain is far more embarrassing than wrapping it up and throwing it away in the dark.

  • Remember not to mix any oil-based lubricants (not store-bought only) with latex condoms! Any oil-based material can weaken the latex too quickly and cause it to crack. This includes hand lotion, Vaseline, cold cream, baby oil, and even lipstick.

  • Newer condoms, such as glow-in-the-dark condoms, may not protect against pregnancy or transmission of STDs, but non-newer flavored condoms will. Check the box for details.

  • Condoms provide little protection if misused. Even if used correctly, the possibility of pregnancy or transmission of sexually transmitted diseases is very low.

  • As a precaution during oral sex, do not put a condom on your or your partner’s tongue or in your mouth. Doing so can cause suffocation and death. Condoms are designed for erection only.

  • Mutual masturbation can spread STDs if your hands come into contact with the fluid. It’s not possible but still possible